Recent Posts
Kevin T. Bauder During the years following my parents’ conversion, our little church went [more]
You can click on the map below and use the arrows to read about each [more]
The Holy Spirit’s characteristic work is not only an ordering of God’s historical-redemptive [more]
The idea of beauty is present in the first chapters of the Bible, as God [more]
I am pleased new announce a new collection of hymns of Christ's passion and resurrection. [more]

An enduring moral order

This entry is part 2 of 2 in the series

"Conservatism Beyond Music"

Read more posts by using the Table of Contents in the right sidebar.

First, the conservative believes that there exists an enduring moral order.

This is the foundational principle of conservatism; as a Christian conservative, I would modify it thus: there is a created, enduring moral order.

The point here is that the conservative is convinced that at least some things in this changeable world are unchanging, and that these unchanging truths are of first importance. Kirk mentions two particular examples: “human nature is a constant, and moral truths are permanent.” Both of these commitments, I believe, are thoroughly biblical.

By way of contrast, the modernist (typically) is committed to some form of empiricism, a trust that truths must be verifiable by testing and sense experience. The problem is that empirical evidence never underwrites a universal conviction; there is always the potential that, after a thousand white birds, the next might be black.

Christians, in particular, are freed from the tyranny of the empirical: where God has spoken, we know, even if we have no independent verification.

Series NavigationPrevious
Michael Riley

About Michael Riley

Student of theology, apologetics, and Christian affections. Pastor of Calvary Baptist Church, Wakefield, Michigan.

READ
Sola Scriptura and Form: What I’m Not Saying

Leave a reply