Author Archives: Scott Aniol

The People’s Work: A Reformation Recovery

The People’s Work: A Reformation Recovery

This year we celebrate the 500 year anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, a theological movement that restored many biblical doctrines and emphases that had been lost or confused during the Middle Ages. Men like John Huss, Martin Luther, Ulrich Zwingli, Martin Bucer, John Calvin, Thomas Cranmer, and others recovered doctrines like justification by faith alone… Continue Reading

Taking Scripture out of Context to Make a Political Point

Taking Scripture out of Context to Make a Political Point

Politics have always been divisive, and it is always especially sad when Christians allow politics to cause them to behave in un-Christian ways. Yet what is also problematic is when Christians take Scripture out of context in an attempt to defend their political views. I’ll give you two examples, one from the right and one… Continue Reading

Detroit Baptist Journal includes my article on Watts’s trinitarian problems and my review of The Benedict Option

Detroit Baptist Journal includes my article on Watts’s trinitarian problems and my review of The Benedict Option

Detroit Baptist Theological Seminary just released volume 22 of their journal, and it includes two contributions from me: “Was Isaac Watts Unitarian? Athanasian Trinitarianism and the Boundary of Christian Fellowship” In this article, I explore whether or not the well-known English hymn writer, Isaac Watts, became Unitarian as some claim, and I use the narrative… Continue Reading

Drawing Near to God as the Essence of Worship

Drawing Near to God as the Essence of Worship

In order to grasp the essence of Christian worship, we must start in the beginning. Creation provides the foundation for understanding not only the nature of God and mankind but also the substance of their relationship in worship. God, the sovereign Initiator, publicly revealed himself through what he made. The creation itself displays his nature… Continue Reading

Preface to Hymns to the Living God

Preface to Hymns to the Living God

The people of God sing. From the earliest days, in both Testaments, God’s people sing as an expression of worship. Miriam and Moses, David and Asaph, Isaiah and Jeremiah, Jesus and Paul—they all sang their praise to God. Indeed, from cover to cover the Scriptures command such heartfelt responses of the affections of believing people:… Continue Reading

The Common Problem with White Supremacy and Multiculturalism

The Common Problem with White Supremacy and Multiculturalism

White supremacy is horrendous. It is contrary to biblical Christianity both by reason of creation and by reason of redemption. All people, regardless of birthplace, ancestry, genetics, or skin color are created in God’s image, and therefore all people are of equal value in God’s sight. All people have been equally affected by sin and… Continue Reading

A Better Way to Sing “Be Thou My Vision”

A Better Way to Sing “Be Thou My Vision”

The old Irish hymn “Be Thou My Vision” is a favorite of many, but the way most Americans sing it weakens the poetic parallelism of the original. The beloved poem was originally written in Old Irish in the 8th century. Notice the repetition of “Rop” in the original verses below: Rop tú mo baile, a… Continue Reading

Download orders of service from my church

Download orders of service from my church

A friend recently asked me about this, so I thought I’d post here in case anyone else is interested. I post our church’s order of service each week on our church web site. If you’re interested to see how I plan, see a “Gospel-shaped liturgy” in practice, or otherwise get ideas for your church’s service,… Continue Reading

Joan Pinkston’s best hymn tune

Joan Pinkston’s best hymn tune

In my first church ministry, we used Hymns of Grace and Glory, edited by my undergraduate theory professor, Joan Pinkston. It’s a great hymnal for many reasons, and one of those is the several excellent hymn tunes composed by Pinkston herself. All of them are good, but in my opinion the best tune she composed is… Continue Reading

But we never talk like that in real life!

But we never talk like that in real life!

It appears today that “authenticity” has become the most important virtue. In one sense this is good. Hypocrisy is a vice condemned by Scripture (Mathew 23:27). I often think about this with regard to my children. Never would I want them to watch me act one way in public with others and think to themselves,… Continue Reading

The “market” for our hymnal

The “market” for our hymnal

A friend recently asked me, “What is your target market for your hymnal?” It’s a fair question. In the modern Christian hymnal publishing industry, editors have a target market in mind, and they choose to include songs that are commonly sung in that market so that they can sell hymnals. Usually, they aim for a… Continue Reading

A new hymn pairing

A new hymn pairing

As we move closer to publishing our print hymnal, Hymns to the Living God, I want to continue to highlight some of the new and unique selections that you will both find in the hymnal and can download for free even now. One of the unique hymns about which I am most pleased is not… Continue Reading

New Hymn by David Oestreich and Josh Bauder

New Hymn by David Oestreich and Josh Bauder

In January I mentioned the sudden passing of our friend, David Oestreich. David had been a supporter and occasional contributor here on the blog, and his tragic death due to complications from pneumonia was a shock to us all. David was quite an accomplished poet. He had several of his poems published in various collections,… Continue Reading

25 more hymns added to our free online collection

25 more hymns added to our free online collection

We’ve just added 25 more hymns to our free, downloadable collection of hymns. These were the final 25 needed for our print hymnal, so we’ve begun to prepare that and are aiming for an August 1 publication date! The following hymns were added: “A Charge to Keep I Have” | BOYLSTON “A Mighty Fortress Is… Continue Reading

I’m Still Here, Too

I’m Still Here, Too

The most recent issue of Frontline Magazine is apparently getting a bit of buzz. I don’t subscribe, but through friends I’m getting caught up. It appears that the Fall 2016 issue, “Convergence,” caused a stir with how it treated the younger generation who grew up in fundamental Baptist churches. As a sort of response, Mark Ward… Continue Reading