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Finding the meaning in shouting preachers

Finding the meaning in shouting preachers.

I assume the best writers, speakers, musicians and artists try to find that golden balance where form and content merge, letting the audience forget the creator but be glued to the creation. In the end, one shining piece of work should stand on its own, appearing unique to itself, not to the creator’s posturing. But I suppose such work exists only rarely.

For me, Spike Jones and those shouting preachers made their points perfectly: “Watch me and be impressed.”

But I certainly wasn’t. They seemed too busy trying to impress themselves — and others. And where was the meaning in that?

Scott Aniol

About Scott Aniol

Scott Aniol is the founder and Executive Director of Religious Affections Ministries. He is Chair of the Worship Ministry Department at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, where he teaches courses in ministry, worship, hymnology, aesthetics, culture, and philosophy. He is the author of Worship in Song: A Biblical Approach to Music and Worship, Sound Worship: A Guide to Making Musical Choices in a Noisy World, and By the Waters of Babylon: Worship in a Post-Christian Culture, and speaks around the country in churches and conferences. He is an elder in his church in Fort Worth, TX where he resides with his wife and four children. Views posted here are his own and not necessarily those of his employer.

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A funny look at typical arguments for traditional music

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