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Harold Best: “Forget Ken Myers, Scott Aniol, Plato, and Augustine”

A few years ago a student told me about comments Harold Best made at the Doxology and Theology Conference about me and the ideas we write about here on this site, but I could never find the audio. Yesterday, another student found it for me. This is instructive to listen to. Best is one of the most influential voices in defense of the complete neutrality and amorality of music; it’s important to understand the perspective for those of us who disagree.

In a later session, someone asks him to further elaborate on those comments (48:00), and he does:

Scott Aniol

About Scott Aniol

Scott Aniol is the founder and Executive Director of Religious Affections Ministries. He is Chair of the Worship Ministry Department at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, where he teaches courses in ministry, worship, hymnology, aesthetics, culture, and philosophy. He is the author of Worship in Song: A Biblical Approach to Music and Worship, Sound Worship: A Guide to Making Musical Choices in a Noisy World, and By the Waters of Babylon: Worship in a Post-Christian Culture, and speaks around the country in churches and conferences. He is an elder in his church in Fort Worth, TX where he resides with his wife and four children. Views posted here are his own and not necessarily those of his employer.

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4 Responses to Harold Best: “Forget Ken Myers, Scott Aniol, Plato, and Augustine”

  1. In the first clip, he says to forget you and all the rest, and your theological constructs, and essentially build our own. So it sounds like he is saying that every man should just do as he pleases before God. Am I hearing and interpreting him correctly? This is the first I have heard him.

  2. While the raw materials of sound, rhythm, timbre, etc. are not filled with bias, the human interaction with these things in music is a different story. My sinfulness can get in the way of all sorts of musical composition, performance, etc.
    Making a statement about the goodness/badness of music needs to be done carefully so that we aren’t confusing what it is that is good/bad. Yes?

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