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The Lutheran Satire lampoons popular Christian worship in “The Gilbert and Sullivan Mass”

Via the Lutheran Satire:

“We could try the same approach that just failed miserably again in seventy years, at which point the lyrical content of popular music will have deteriorated to such an extent that those emulating that style will find it virtually impossible to confess anything that is of Christian substance in their worship music. This, in turn, will instill in whatever youth that remain the revivalistic sectarian notion that whatever makes a Christian is not the substance of which he believes, but the feely-goody-feelingness with which he feels it. Such a notion will then cultivate in our youth a faith like the seed sown on the rocky soil, resulting in a large crop of feely-goody Christians falling away from the Christian faith the moment it stops feeling good to be a Christian.”

Ryan Martin

About Ryan Martin

Ryan Martin is pastor of the First Baptist Church of Granite Falls, Minnesota. Prior to that, he served as the associate pastor of Bethany Bible Church in Hendersonville, North Carolina. He is on the board of directors of Religious Affections Ministries. Ryan received his undergraduate degree at Northland Baptist Bible College, and has received further training from Central Baptist Theological Seminary of Minneapolis, Minn. (M.Div., 2004; Ph.D., 2013). He was ordained in 2009 at Bible Baptist Church of Elk River, Minn. (now Otsego, Minn.). He has a wife and children too.

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