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“We Just Use Their Music”

I just read an interesting article from Bethel School of Supernatural Ministry, a ministry of Bethel Redding, of whom you’ve probably heard. In fact, you’ve probably sung some Bethel songs if your church is beholden to CCLI. Now, I haven’t delved deeply into the world of the prosperity gospel since I left that movement in the mid-1990’s, but the foundational tenets haven’t really changed as far as I can tell. They still market themselves through their music and aesthetic: they don’t waste time presenting their doctrines systematically. But some people simply don’t know what kinds of things charismatic prosperity gospelleurs actually teach. Read this:

BSSM | 10 Ways to Be Activated in the Supernatural

Everything sound in order to you?

When I read this article, I thought to share it with those of us who have staked everything on the absolute fact that associations do not matter. Certainly a theology of the Spirit that is this base and craven–dare I say Canaanite–could not pass the impermeable barrier into their worship music, right?

Have you noticed that in their music they address the Holy Spirit like they’re trying to lure a timid bear cub out of the woods with Pop Tarts? I wonder whether that could be related to their theology of the Supernatural.

 

 

About Christopher Ames

Pastor of Grace Baptist Church in Boyceville, Wisconsin. Bicycle owner and operator. I used to play in a Campus Crusade band.

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Tozer on irreverent worship

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