Tag Archives: excitements

The problem with defining worship in any way by physical response

I’ve been teaching recently about the differences between Jonathan Edwards and Charles Finney. In most ways, these men, their philosophies, theologies, and practices are polar opposites. But if you study what these men wrote, you can’t  help but notice what appear to be similarities in what they said. And the deeper you look, the more… Continue Reading

Why trying to emulate Edwards may actually be emulating Finney

I’ve been doing some reading recently from both Jonathan Edwards and Charles Finney. In most ways, these men, their philosophies, theologies, and practices are polar opposites. But as I studied, I couldn’t help but notice what appear to be similarities in what they said. And the deeper I looked, the more apparent it became that… Continue Reading

Emotion, Worship, Revivalism, and Pentecostalism

Emotion, Worship, Revivalism, and Pentecostalism

After considering the following theological and historical underpinnings of contemporary worship, consider the theological positions of those most influential in evangelical worship today. From W. Robert Godfrey, “Worship and the Emotions,” in Give Praise to God, Philip Graham Ryken, et.al. (Phillipsburg: P & R Pub, 2003), 368-9: When emotions are misused, there is a constant… Continue Reading

Charles Finney on "excitements"

From Revivals of Religion (CBN University Press), 1978. Men are so sluggish, there are so many things to lead their minds off from religion and to oppose the influence of the Gospel, that it is necessary to raise an excitement among them, till the tide rises so high as to sweep away the opposing obstacles. They… Continue Reading

"How many people really attend church to worship God?"

"How many people really attend church to worship God?"

Pastor DeBruyn at Slice of Laodicea discusses “Religious Excitements.” So, church leadership designs worship services to be an experience akin to attending a Pacer game. A pervasive “need” seems to exist amongst congregants to get excited over excitement. I presume that’s why churches call their Sunday morning services, “celebrations” (Remember the tune, “Celebration,” by Kool… Continue Reading