Tag Archives: fundamentalism

Roger, Roger | Part Four: Today’s Situation

Roger, Roger | Part Four: Today’s Situation

A few weeks ago, Roger Olson of Baylor University devoted a blog post to asking “What Is ‘Fundamentalism?’” By way of contrast he was also trying to say how fundamentalism differs from evangelicalism. He used Edward John Carnell’s critique of fundamentalism as the fulcrum of his argument. Olson did not mention that Carnell’s “Exhibit A”… Continue Reading

Roger, Roger | Part Three: Necessary Qualifications

Roger, Roger | Part Three: Necessary Qualifications

Kevin T. Bauder [Editor’s note: A technical difficulty prevented last week’s essay from being emailed. Part Two of this series can be found on Central Seminary’s website.] Over the past couple of weeks I’ve been responding to Roger Olson, who teaches at Truett Seminary (Baylor University). Not long ago Roger blogged about the difference between… Continue Reading

Roger, Roger | Part Two: Fundamentalism and New Evangelicalism

Roger, Roger | Part Two: Fundamentalism and New Evangelicalism

Kevin T. Bauder I am responding to colleague Roger Olson who, in a recent blog post, attempted to articulate the difference between fundamentalism and evangelicalism. His argument relied upon an old critique in which Edward John Carnell labeled fundamentalism as “cultic orthodoxy.” My first step was to flesh out Carnell’s critique by placing it in… Continue Reading

Roger, Roger | Part One: Edward John Carnell

Roger, Roger | Part One: Edward John Carnell

I appreciate many aspects of Roger Olson’s work. He has written a clear exposition of Arminian theology that I require my students to read. He can show civility and charity toward those with whom he disagrees. We are on opposite sides of certain issues, but I know him to be a man of both clarity… Continue Reading

Concluding Thoughts on the NTAIBC and the FBFI

Concluding Thoughts on the NTAIBC and the FBFI

Kevin T. Bauder Over the past several weeks I’ve been writing about the founding of the New Testament Association of Independent Baptist Churches and the renaming of the Fundamental Baptist Fellowship from the old Conservative Baptist Fellowship. This is not ancient history, but it is history that has been largely forgotten. Many younger leaders who… Continue Reading

The NTAIBC and the FBF

The NTAIBC and the FBF

Kevin T. Bauder The New Testament Association of Baptist Churches voted itself into existence and adopted a constitution in 1965 at Beth Eden Baptist Church in Denver. The occasion was a gathering of the Conservative Baptist Fellowship, which set aside time during its meeting to initiate the new association. That summer, B. Myron Cedarholm resigned… Continue Reading

The Beginnings of the New Testament Association

The Beginnings of the New Testament Association

Kevin T. Bauder By the early 1960s three issues divided the Conservative Baptist Movement. First was the question of separation, especially in view of neoevangelicalism and Billy Graham’s tactic of “cooperative evangelism.” Second was eschatology—many Conservative Baptists had moved away from pretribulationism, and some had abandoned premillennialism. Third was the relationship between the agencies (such… Continue Reading

The Conservative Baptist Conflict

The Conservative Baptist Conflict

Kevin T. Bauder The Conservative Baptist Movement formally began when the Fundamentalist Fellowship organized the Conservative Baptist Foreign Mission Society in 1943. The CBFMS was originally meant to function within the convention, but it was rapidly rejected by convention officials who effectively disenfranchised its supporters. In response, the Fundamentalist Fellowship renamed itself the Conservative Baptist… Continue Reading

Corrigendum

Corrigendum

Kevin T. Bauder In a recent edition of “In the Nick of Time,” I wrote about the founding of the New Testament Association of Independent Baptist Churches and the renaming of the Conservative Baptist Fellowship to the Fundamental Baptist Fellowship. The CBF was the parent organization of both the NTAIBC and the FBF(I). Unfortunately, I… Continue Reading

Celebrating a New Decade: Retrospect and Prospect

Celebrating a New Decade: Retrospect and Prospect

Roy Beacham Central Baptist Theological Seminary was founded in 1956. Upon the closing of Northwestern Theological Seminary in Minneapolis, students, faculty, and other sponsors urged Dr. Richard V. Clearwaters to open a new seminary in order to fill the vacancy of such a training institution in the upper-Midwest. This past school year, 2016-2017, Central Seminary began… Continue Reading

I’m Looking Forward to This

I’m Looking Forward to This

Kevin T. Bauder Of the various conferences that I attend, one that I look forward to is the annual meeting of the Fundamental Baptist Fellowship, International. It’s also one that I don’t have the privilege of attending very often. It is usually far from my home, and it typically falls in the middle of the… Continue Reading

I’m Still Here, Too

I’m Still Here, Too

The most recent issue of Frontline Magazine is apparently getting a bit of buzz. I don’t subscribe, but through friends I’m getting caught up. It appears that the Fall 2016 issue, “Convergence,” caused a stir with how it treated the younger generation who grew up in fundamental Baptist churches. As a sort of response, Mark Ward… Continue Reading

A Good Man, a Good Christian, a Good Fundamentalist

A Good Man, a Good Christian, a Good Fundamentalist

When I was in Bible college, seminary training was considered a luxury—perhaps useful, but not at all necessary for pastoral ministry. Consequently, the idea of going to seminary didn’t enter my mind until the end of my junior year. At that point, two events led me to seminary. First, a professor liked a paper I… Continue Reading

Implications from Isaac Watts’s Trinitarian Controversy

Implications from Isaac Watts’s Trinitarian Controversy

Yesterday at the national meeting of the Evangelical Theological Society, I presented a paper evaluating Isaac Watts’s Trinitarian views. I hope to get the paper published soon, but in the meantime, here are several of the very relevant implications I drew related to the boundary of Christian fellowship, the importance of church tradition and creeds,… Continue Reading

Fundamentalism and a Conservative Philosophy of Culture

Fundamentalism and a Conservative Philosophy of Culture

This entry is part 5 of 8 in the series That They May Be One: Conservatism, Cooperation, and the Center of Christian Unity You can read more posts from the series by using the Contents in the right sidebar.

This entry is part 5 of 8 in the series”That They May Be One: Conservatism, Cooperation, and the Center of Christian Unity”You can read more posts from the series by using the Table of Contents in the right sidebar. Last week I suggested that biblical cooperation is not an “all-or-nothing” sort of thing, but is rather… Continue Reading

Should philosophies of culture hinder cooperation?

Should philosophies of culture hinder cooperation?

This entry is part 1 of 8 in the series That They May Be One: Conservatism, Cooperation, and the Center of Christian Unity You can read more posts from the series by using the Contents in the right sidebar.

This entry is part 1 of 8 in the series”That They May Be One: Conservatism, Cooperation, and the Center of Christian Unity”You can read more posts from the series by using the Table of Contents in the right sidebar. There are several adjectives that I happily use to describe myself and my beliefs. The first… Continue Reading

The MBA 2016

The MBA 2016

Baptist churches in America organized their first local association (the Philadelphia Association) in 1707. That group soon grew to include congregations all the way from Connecticut to Virginia. As it grew it birthed a number of daughter associations. Subsequently, Baptists have founded yet others. Eventually the local associations within particular states or other large regions… Continue Reading

Following Up

Following Up

A few weeks ago I responded to the accusation, leveled in a report by Private Investigators International, that Robert T. Ketcham was guilty of “long-time sexual addictions.” At the time I noted that the report specified four sources for the accusation: E. Alan Cockrell (interim executive administrator of the Association of Baptists for World Evangelism… Continue Reading

On Accusation and Rebuke

On Accusation and Rebuke

A bishop has to meet stringent personal qualifications, the broadest of which is that he must be “blameless” (1 Tim. 3:2). Of course, blameless does not mean sinless, but it does require at minimum that no credible charge of scandal can be lodged against him. In other words, a minister’s reputation is one of his… Continue Reading