Recent Posts
While the book of Acts gives examples of early churches gathering for worship—Scripture reading, [more]
Some might be surprised to learn that the word emotion is perhaps only 200 years [more]
Christians are often hurt and confused when problems come up and a leader abruptly leaves. [more]
Knock. Knock. Knock. Who could that be at the door? you think. I have so [more]
Jeff Straub Monday night, June 17th, in the presence of his family, Dr. Rolland McCune [more]

“Not all preferences are autonomous and selfish.”

Mark Snoeberger helpfully explains here why some preferences are bad reasons to leave a church, while other preferences may rightfully lead someone to change membership. This can include preference concerning preaching, baptism, communion, and music.

He concludes,

Of course, there will always be occasions in which believers, after careful study, disagree about what the Scriptures teach on several of these issues, or disagree mightily on the best ways to fulfill these revealed functions of the gathered church. In some cases (and perhaps more often than is supposed) the disagreements are small enough to tolerate. But at times churches who err in these matters leave the church’s work incomplete and its worshipers spiritually starved, bruised, dismayed, and discouraged—even angry at the despite they believe has been done to the person and cause of Christ.

In many cases it is quite possible for all involved to amicably and eagerly call each other brothers in Christ. But they eventually will come to worship separately, and should worship separately. And it is not (necessarily) because one party or the other has “made the worship experience about himself and not the God being worshiped.”

via On “Preferences” and Church Membership.

Scott Aniol

About Scott Aniol

Scott Aniol is the founder and Executive Director of Religious Affections Ministries. He is Chair of the Worship Ministry Department at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, where he teaches courses in ministry, worship, hymnology, aesthetics, culture, and philosophy. He is the author of Worship in Song: A Biblical Approach to Music and Worship, Sound Worship: A Guide to Making Musical Choices in a Noisy World, and By the Waters of Babylon: Worship in a Post-Christian Culture, and speaks around the country in churches and conferences. He is an elder in his church in Fort Worth, TX where he resides with his wife and four children. Views posted here are his own and not necessarily those of his employer.

One Response to “Not all preferences are autonomous and selfish.”

  1. It’s interesting that some of the same people will passionately insist that even Biblically informed “preferences” are never a sufficient reason to keep trite, worldly music OUT of a church to begin with.

Leave a reply