Tag Archives: Martin Luther

On the relationship of faith and works

On the relationship of faith and works

I still confess the doctrine of justification by faith alone. The Scriptures teach repeatedly that no man is or can be saved by his works. This matter is central in importance to the Gospel of Jesus Christ. In 1 Corinthians 15, Paul teaches that the Gospel is that Christ died for our sins and rose again in accordance with… Continue Reading

Here I Stand

Here I Stand

I just finished reading Here I Stand, the biography of Martin Luther by Roland Bainton. I look forward to the day I feel the rugged embrace of Luther as two who are one in Christ, justified by faith alone. As I read one of Luther’s hymns in the final chapter of my book, I was moved to… Continue Reading

Luther on the centrality of the Word in worship

Luther on the centrality of the Word in worship

Martin Luther did not want to revolutionize completely the traditional worship of the Western church. He did, however, believe that preaching of the Word had been sorely neglected. In 1523, he published some instructions on the “Order of Public Worship,” and therein he identified three errors that were common in papal worship services: (1) the… Continue Reading

Calvin and Platonic aesthetics

Calvin and Platonic aesthetics

Yesterday, Scott Aniol showed that Martin Luther was influenced by Greek aesthetics, including that of Plato. In light of Dr. Aniol’s post, it is worth highlighting that Luther was not alone among the Reformers to be influenced by Plato’s thought on music. Calvin, in his preface to the Genevan Psalter, also cited Plato’s views: But… Continue Reading

The Influence of Greek Thought on Martin Luther’s Aesthetics

The Influence of Greek Thought on Martin Luther’s Aesthetics

When Martin Luther nailed his ninety-five theses to the door of the church at Wittenburg in 1517, he not only sparked a theological reformation in the Church, but he also led the way for reforms in the Church’s music. Luther’s primary objections were with the Roman Church’s theology, yet the church reforms he began had implications in… Continue Reading

Martin Luther’s Approach to Culture

Martin Luther’s Approach to Culture

This entry is part 3 of 20 in the series Christ the Sanctifier of Behavior You can read more posts from the series by using the Contents in the right sidebar.

When Martin Luther (1483–1546) begins making reforms in the church, one of the most significant issues he faces is the relationship between the civil and ecclesiastical authorities. Thus, Luther articulates an understanding of antithesis and commonality that in many ways reflects what came before him but in such a way that he is often credited… Continue Reading

The Reformation and Worship

The Reformation and Worship

Here are some articles in honor of Reformation Day: Did Luther Use Tunes from Love Songs? The Conservatism of the Normative Principle Martin Luther’s Worship Reforms Reformation Hymns The Liberating Regulative Principle of Worship My Regulative Principe Epiphany Conservative Christians will be Committed to Worship Regulated by the Word of God       Continue Reading

Renaissance and early Reformation Settings of Psalm 130 (Part 3)

Renaissance and early Reformation Settings of Psalm 130 (Part 3)

This entry is part 3 of 6 in the series A History of Psalm 130 in Music You can read more posts from the series by using the Contents in the right sidebar.

Last week we heard what Psalm 130 might have sounded like in ancient Jewish settings, as well as the Gregorian chant version of it. As early as the 6th century, medieval Christians began grouping particular psalms together that all confessed sorrow over sin and pleaded for forgiveness from God. Augustine had originally identified four of… Continue Reading

Rambling thoughts on corporate prayer

Rambling thoughts on corporate prayer

Matthew Henry said, “It is taken for granted that all the disciples of Christ pray. As soon as ever Paul was converted, behold he prayeth. You may as soon find a living man that does not breathe, as a living Christian that does not pray.” Luther said, “Prayer . . . is as strictly and… Continue Reading