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Missions and Music

This entry is part 1 of 16 in the series

"Missions and Music"

You can read more posts from the series by using the Table of Contents in the right sidebar.

One of missionaries most challenging issues is what kind of music to use as they plant indigenous churches. Two extremes exist: on the one hand are missionaries who simply impose American musical forms on the foreign church; on the other hand are those who indiscriminately adopt the forms of the native culture in their worship.

In order to attempt to help with this issue, we are going to dedicate the entire month of January to this issue. Each of our authors will seek to address the following question from their own unique perspective:

How should a missionary, attempting to plant indigenous churches, approach the issue of music in the culture in which he ministers?

I hope you’ll pay close attention to this series and interact along the way!

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Scott Aniol

About Scott Aniol

Scott Aniol is the founder and Executive Director of Religious Affections Ministries. He is on faculty at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, where he teaches courses in ministry, worship, hymnology, aesthetics, culture, and philosophy. He has written several books, dozens of articles, and speaks around the country in churches and conferences. He is an elder in his church in Fort Worth, TX where he resides with his wife and two children.

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