Tag Archives: C. S. Lewis

The Salvation of Susan Pevensie

The Salvation of Susan Pevensie

A beautiful meditation on one of my favorite books: Why does the apparent apostasy of Susan seem like a gaping narratival hole that doesn’t fit with any part of the larger story? I want to argue that it does not seem to fit because it really doesn’t fit. My intention is to show that a… Continue Reading

The Green Book

The Green Book

Poor Alex and Martin. Misters King and Ketley had no idea that their forgettable English textbook would unleash one of the twentieth century’s most eloquent and destructive critiques of modernism, with the two of them in the marksman’s crosshairs. The Control of Language: A Critical Approach to Reading and Writing, was published in 1939 as… Continue Reading

Surprised by Joy

Surprised by Joy

A primary question we often ask in programming proclamation music for worship is, “How will this music work to attract people’s attention?”  Perhaps we should ask, “Does this music reflect anything of God’s character?”  The latter question seems to me to indicate a confidence in God’s own attraction in and of Himself.  It seems unavoidable… Continue Reading

The Abolition of Man by C. S. Lewis

The Abolition of Man by C. S. Lewis

This entry is part 8 of 18 in the series Books Every Conservative (and Liberal) Christian Should Read You can read more posts from the series by using the Contents in the right sidebar.

Some writers are skilled builders, and it is enjoyable just to watch them work, even if you couldn’t care less what they are building. C. S. Lewis is one of those writers, and the book under consideration is one of those books. Consider: how many books you can think of from the twentieth century from… Continue Reading

Men Without Chests

Men Without Chests

The following are quotes from the first chapter of The Abolition of Man by C. S. Lewis: “Until quite modern times all teachers and even all men believed the universe to be such that certain emotional reactions on our part could be either congruous or incongruous to it—believed, in fact, that objects did not merely… Continue Reading