Tag Archives: corporate worship

The Missionary Imperative of Missional Worship

The Missionary Imperative of Missional Worship

This entry is part 9 of 12 in the series Missional Worship You can read more posts from the series by using the Contents in the right sidebar.

Part of the difficulty in attempting to synthesize a philosophy of missional worship is that many different groups have adopted the term missional to describe their approach to church ministry, not all of which ascribe to the fundamental characteristics of the missional movement. For example, while missional church advocates discussed in this series repudiate an… Continue Reading

To sing or not to sing, that is the question

To sing or not to sing, that is the question

An interesting online discussion has emerged in the past few weeks about the issue of not singing a particular song in a service when that song expresses sentiments you do not believe to be true. The discussion began with Roger Olson, who argued that we should not sing a song when the doctrine does not… Continue Reading

Rambling thoughts on corporate prayer

Rambling thoughts on corporate prayer

Matthew Henry said, “It is taken for granted that all the disciples of Christ pray. As soon as ever Paul was converted, behold he prayeth. You may as soon find a living man that does not breathe, as a living Christian that does not pray.” Luther said, “Prayer . . . is as strictly and… Continue Reading

Reforming Influences in 19th Century American Church Music

Reforming Influences in 19th Century American Church Music

This entry is part 4 of 4 in the series 19th Century American Church Music You can read more posts from the series by using the Contents in the right sidebar.

There were many composers, writers, and organizations during the nineteenth┬ácentury that objected to the current condition of American church music and encouraged┬áreform. Yet none had as lasting influence as the Boston Handel and Haydn Society,┬áThomas Hastings, and Lowell Mason. Boston Handel and Haydn Society The Handel and Haydn Society was formed in 1815 in Boston… Continue Reading

Reverence in prayer

The section on prayer in John Calvin’s Institutes of the Christian Religion is surely one of the most beloved passages of that influential work. Therein, Calvin addresses, among other matters, the importance of reverence in corporate prayer. For Calvin, an essential mark of reverence in corporate prayer is attentiveness. He says, Whoever engaged in prayer… Continue Reading