Tag Archives: incarnation

The Missional Church and Culture

The Missional Church and Culture

This entry is part 1 of 8 in the series Toward a Biblical Understanding of Culture You can read more posts from the series by using the Contents in the right sidebar.

The missional church movement has significantly influenced the evangelical church in recent years, especially their philosophy of evangelism and worship (see my recent series on this subject here). Missional advocates argue that the church is part of the missio Dei—the mission of God—and thus must see its ministries as fitting within that mission. Essential to… Continue Reading

“Glory Be to God on High” by Charles Wesley

“Glory Be to God on High” by Charles Wesley

A while back I stumbled across Charles Wesley’s Christmas hymn, “Glory Be to God on High.” This is a superb text on the incarnation of Christ, and I thought this would be a good time to recommend it here. We’ve sung it to the 18th century tune Amsterdam. The hymns is a meditation on the… Continue Reading

See the Babe in Manger Lowly

See the Babe in Manger Lowly

See the babe in manger lowly, with His mother, meek and mild. Here the Godhead now incarnate, Wholly God and yet a child. Lying in a bed for livestock, This, the Prince of heav’n was He, Human flesh and blood and body– Hypostatic Deity. See the angels praise His coming, He their King from heaven’s… Continue Reading

Insights on the Incarnation, Ancient and Modern

Here is a spectrum of theological observations on the incarnation ranging over the past 1800 years.   Helpful in the light of C. S. Lewis’s admonition regarding old texts, both for your own meditation, and for use in the congregation. Irenaeus ( – c. 202) on the Incarnation Tertullian (c. 160 – c. 220) on… Continue Reading

Incarnation Hymnody: "Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence" and "Come, Thou Long-Expected Jesus"

Incarnation Hymnody: "Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence" and "Come, Thou Long-Expected Jesus"

This entry is part 2 of 6 in the series Incarnation Hymnody You can read more posts from the series by using the Contents in the right sidebar.

Today’s post continues our series on “incarnation hymnody.”  Today: the ancient “Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence” and Charles Wesley’s “Come, Thou Long-Expected Jesus.” ____________________ “Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence” is an ancient song and an interesting example of singing texts with a different understanding than the text’s author intended.  Because the hymn is… Continue Reading