Author Archives: David de Bruyn

Limited Atonement: Rejecting What Was Never Provided?

Limited Atonement: Rejecting What Was Never Provided?

This entry is part 3 of 3 in the series Definite Atonement's Indefinite Inferences You can read more posts from the series by using the Contents in the right sidebar.

We have seen that to prove beyond reasonable doubt that Scripture teaches particular redemption, an advocate would need to show an explicit negation: a denial that Christ provided atonement for the non-elect. Instead of such a negation, we find references to universal provision of atonement. We find application of Christ’s atonement limited to the elect,… Continue Reading

Limited Atonement: Provision and Application

Limited Atonement: Provision and Application

This entry is part 2 of 3 in the series Definite Atonement's Indefinite Inferences You can read more posts from the series by using the Contents in the right sidebar.

Proponents of definite atonement wish to avoid a “hypothetical” atonement by asserting that the elect’s sins were actually atoned for, when Christ died in A. D. 33. This has the unintended logical consequence of eternal justification: the hyper-Calvinist notion that the elect were justified before their birth. To avoid this logical consequence, proponents of particular… Continue Reading

Limited Atonement and Eternal Justification

Limited Atonement and Eternal Justification

This entry is part 1 of 3 in the series Definite Atonement's Indefinite Inferences You can read more posts from the series by using the Contents in the right sidebar.

Limited Atonement, also known as definite atonement and particular redemption, is regarded by some as a kind of Shibboleth of Reformed or Calvinistic Orthodoxy. Disavow particular redemption, and you are a closet Arminian, an Arminian in Calvinist clothing, or even an inconsistent Universalist. If your TULIP lacks the middle petal, it’s a disfigured flower, they… Continue Reading

Nine Biblical Truths Regarding the Doctrine of Election (2)

Nine Biblical Truths Regarding the Doctrine of Election (2)

This entry is part 3 of 3 in the series The Misunderstood Doctrine of Election You can read more posts from the series by using the Contents in the right sidebar.

We continue to examine nine biblical theses regarding election. 6. The individuals given to Christ by the Father are chosen in Christ. just as He chose us in Him before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy and without blame before Him in love, (Eph. 1:4) When Paul says that God has… Continue Reading

Merry Christmas, Heretics, One and All

Merry Christmas, Heretics, One and All

Security companies enjoy a kind of odd gratitude for criminals. After all, without the threat of crime, security companies would have little in the way of business. It’s thanks to the attempted and successful acts of crime that security companies develop their walls, fences, locks, and alarms. Christians, too, should have a similar kind of… Continue Reading

Nine Biblical Truths Regarding the Doctrine of Election (1)

Nine Biblical Truths Regarding the Doctrine of Election (1)

This entry is part 2 of 3 in the series The Misunderstood Doctrine of Election You can read more posts from the series by using the Contents in the right sidebar.

In our last post, we showed that all Christians implicitly or explicitly accept the idea of election: that God controls (directly or permissively) the destinies of His creatures. A philosophical defence goes only so far, however. We wish now to review nine biblical truths regarding the doctrine of election. 1. God does not wish anyone… Continue Reading

Why Every Christian (Ultimately) Believes in Election

Why Every Christian (Ultimately) Believes in Election

This entry is part 1 of 3 in the series The Misunderstood Doctrine of Election You can read more posts from the series by using the Contents in the right sidebar.

The idea that God chooses or “elects” people is taught in many Scriptures (Rom 8:29-30; Eph 1:4; 2 Thes 2:13; 1 Pet 1:2). People struggle with this concept. Doesn’t that make the whole thing unfair? Isn’t it unjust to choose people for salvation? Surely salvation is then all a stacked-deck, with people nothing more than… Continue Reading

Equality is Medicine, Not Food

Equality is Medicine, Not Food

This entry is part 38 of 38 in the series Ten Mangled Words You can read more posts from the series by using the Contents in the right sidebar.

I do not think that equality is one of those things (like wisdom or happiness) which are good simply in themselves and for their own sakes. I think it is in the same class as medicine, which is good because we are ill, or clothes which are good because we are no longer innocent. I… Continue Reading

A Tale of Two Sons

A Tale of Two Sons

A great king had two sons, who were come to the age where one should be named as the crown prince. The custom of that country was that the king would choose his heir directly, without weight given to birth-order. He was hard-pressed at the choice, for they both loved him and had noble and… Continue Reading

Elders in a Baptist Church: Plural, Yea; Lay, Nay (4)

Elders in a Baptist Church: Plural, Yea; Lay, Nay (4)

This entry is part 4 of 4 in the series Elders in a Baptist Church You can read more posts from the series by using the Contents in the right sidebar.

Our study of elders in New Testament churches has suggested that the concept of lay elders is not as self-evident as some of its advocates propose. Our argument consists of four premises. First, Scripture describes plural elders in first-century New Testament churches, but does not prescribe this plurality, removing the need to find and appoint… Continue Reading

Elders in a Baptist Church: Plural, Yea; Lay, Nay (3)

Elders in a Baptist Church: Plural, Yea; Lay, Nay (3)

This entry is part 3 of 4 in the series Elders in a Baptist Church You can read more posts from the series by using the Contents in the right sidebar.

In considering the question of lay elders, we have seen that the New Testament describes but never prescribes a plurality of elders in a New Testament church. It does, however, prescribe the remuneration of elders that rule well. In part 2, we saw that ruling well is likely best understood as equivalent to laboring in the… Continue Reading

Elders in a Baptist Church: Plural, Yea; Lay, Nay (2)

Elders in a Baptist Church: Plural, Yea; Lay, Nay (2)

This entry is part 2 of 4 in the series Elders in a Baptist Church You can read more posts from the series by using the Contents in the right sidebar.

In some cases, “lay” elders are introduced into Baptist churches because those doing so believe that a plurality of elders is an explicit or implicit requirement of the New Testament. Many believe a church with only one pastor has a sub-standard or sub-biblical ecclesiology, and the pragmatic solution to achieving this supposed requirement of multiple… Continue Reading

Elders in a Baptist Church: Plural, Yea; Lay, Nay (1)

Elders in a Baptist Church: Plural, Yea; Lay, Nay (1)

This entry is part 1 of 4 in the series Elders in a Baptist Church You can read more posts from the series by using the Contents in the right sidebar.

I’ll sometimes hear the claim from some men that a plurality of elders, made up of “staff elders” and “lay elders” in a local church, represents orthodox, biblical ecclesiology and that any church (such as mine) with only one paid elder, several deacons and no lay elders represents a deviation from biblical church polity, or… Continue Reading

Equality and Distinctions

Equality and Distinctions

This entry is part 37 of 38 in the series Ten Mangled Words You can read more posts from the series by using the Contents in the right sidebar.

Those who believe in cosmic justice are actually at war with nature. If you desire to have all people have absolutely equal opportunities (as in our sprint race example) by manipulating all kinds of variables, you are actually fighting against the created order. You are fighting biology, genetics, and indeed, providence. If you’re a Cosmic… Continue Reading

Undiscerning Discernment

Undiscerning Discernment

One of the ways you make your mark in the online discernment ministry world is by “outing” a popular and generally reliable pastor or Bible teacher. This promotes you in the eyes of discernment devotees, because you are supposedly spotting error in a teacher that “everyone else unquestioningly follows”, and are willing to be the… Continue Reading

Spurgeon Uncut and Unpasted

Spurgeon Uncut and Unpasted

Reading Spurgeon is a sheer delight to the heart. At the same time, it is often faintly discouraging to the preacher. How could a preacher manage such eloquence? His sentences are positively dripping with imagery, his prose saturated with trope and metaphor. It seems impossible for such poetic gold to have flowed from a preacher… Continue Reading

The Many Meanings of “Reformed”

The Many Meanings of “Reformed”

I find it quite amusing these days to be classified by some as “Reformed”, when I’d barely heard the term for most of my Christian life. I grew up in Baptist circles that didn’t use the term “Reformed”. In fact, the first time I heard it used of my church was when a student attending… Continue Reading